The Pentagon will spend $ 2 billion on the introduction of artificial intelligence in weapons systems

The US Department of Defense said it will spend $ 2 billion on the development, integration of artificial intelligence into military systems and increasing the level of confidence in them..

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), with the support of the presidential administration, decided to step up work in this direction in order to keep up with Russia and China in the arms race. In July, contractor Booz Allen Hamilton was awarded a five-year contract for the development of AI programs in the amount of $ 885 million. Their names and features are classified.

For the further development of the Maven project, which improves the ability of military computers to recognize objects in photographs, next year will allocate almost $ 93 million more. Previously, its development was led by Google, which refused to renew the contract, not wanting to participate in improving the software for destroying targets..

In total, over 5 years, the US Department of Defense intends to spend about $ 2 billion on projects related to AI and their integration. The official document says that at the moment the military does not have autonomous weapons systems capable of finding, tracking and attacking targets without the participation of the operator..

The Pentagon will spend $ 2 billion on the introduction of artificial intelligence in weapons systems

DARPA currently has 25 AI research programs. As part of the increased funding, it is planned to attract $ 1 billion. According to representatives of the organization, the ability of systems to independently make decisions and explain the reasons for their actions to operators will be critical in a war..

Machine learning systems are increasingly being used in controversial areas. Experts from the World Economic Forum concluded that AI can destabilize the financial system.

Author: Ivan Malichenko

The Pentagon will spend $ 2 billion on the introduction of artificial intelligence in weapons systems

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