A circuit invented that generates pure, limitless energy from graphene

A circuit invented that generates pure, limitless energy from graphene

Physicists have developed a circuit capable of trapping the thermal motion of graphene and converting it into low-voltage electrical current.

This energy harvesting mechanism contradicts Richard Feynman’s assertion that Brownian motion cannot do the job. However, a team from the University of Arkansas found that the thermal motion of graphene at room temperature can actually generate alternating current in the circuit..

To do this, the scientists built a circuit with two diodes to convert alternating current to direct current. The diodes are located opposite each other, which allows the current to flow in both directions, provides separation of the paths of its passage, creating a pulsed direct current that does work on the load resistor.

The team also found that the on / off and switching behavior of the diodes increased the power supplied, rather than lowering it as was previously thought. To prove this phenomenon, scientists relied on the nascent field of stochastic thermodynamics and extended the famous Nyquist theory.

A circuit invented that generates pure, limitless energy from graphene

Physicists also note a symbiotic relationship between graphene and circuitry, since they have the same temperature and heat does not move between them, but the thermal environment does work with the pull-up resistor. As a result of the separation of hot and cold electrons, the relatively slow motion of a two-dimensional material induces a current in the circuit at low frequencies.

In the future, scientists plan to find out whether it is possible to store the constant current obtained in this way in a capacitor for later use. This goal requires miniaturizing the circuit and applying it to a silicon wafer or microcircuit. If they manage to fit millions of such circuits on a small chip (1×1 mm), they can serve as a replacement for a low-power battery..

Recall that recently, scientists have also developed a device that generates electricity from any surrounding vibrations..

text: Ilya Bauer, photo: University of Arkansas

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